Saturday, 13 November 2010

Holystone North Wood

Holystone North Wood, a semi-natural, acid sessile oakwood, more typical perhaps of the Lake District, is a little way to the north of the Holystone Burn. It is thought to have survived since at least 1700. Many of the trees have multiple stems suggestive of copicing in the past, although records show that the wood was last worked in this manner over sixty years ago.

The Forestry Commission plans to increase the oak woodland in Holystone to over one hundred hectares. Many of the surrounding conifer plantations are now being felled and will be replaced with oaks grown from local seed.

The wood is approached by an up-hill walk through, and then along the edge of one of the conifer plantations. The first view of the wood, across a small pasture when leaving the conifers, is most inviting ...

Some of the wood is fenced off to allow natural regeneration, but there is still plenty to see from the public paths ...


During my visit this week, I had good views of small groups of feeding Redpolls and Long-tailed Tits. Jays and a Red Squirrel were also active. I also found this Bonnet Mycena (Mycena galericulata) growing on a decaying deciduous tree ...

The return walk to the car park offered good views south towards the Holystone Burn, in the valley beyond the pasture, and Holystone Common ...

8 comments:

Citybirding said...

Emma,
What a cracking range of plants and colours in your Mycena photograph.

holdingmoments said...

What a great woodland Emma. It must hold a multitude of wildlife.

Wilma said...

That is great old piece of woodland. The Mycena photo is wonderful, as are the sunshine and colors of the landscape photos. Much appreciated on this dreary day in Minnesota.

cheers,
Wilma

Emma Anderson said...

Thanks to Keith and Dick. Re wildlife, here's a piece from the Northumberland Wildlife Trust description of the site:

The ground flora is relatively poor but notable species include chickweed, wintergreen and lesser twayblade. Moss hummocks of Leucobryum glaucum are a special feature of the wood and can be seen at the northern edge. Also look out for wood anemone, and woodland birds such as wood warbler, tawny owl and woodcock.

ADRIAN said...

Once again so different to the Northumberland I know. Getting nearer and nearer is a wander up. The Bonnet Mycena is good Is that smokey Ploypore behind it?

Roy said...

Lovely scenes Emma. Not seen any Redpolls yet this winter, but hoping to soon.

The Wessex Reiver said...

You are making me homesick Emma, in a nice way. The view over the meadow I know well, then the view a bit further round back down the meadow to the hills. Its lovely in the south West, but home is home.

You probably know this but the water in Lady's Well is so pure it's reputedly unable to contain wildlife. Possibly a folk take but I've never seen any pont life in there.

kirstallcreatures said...

I love those woodlandscapes Emma, Linda